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The current electricity supply is being challenged by generating capacity and seasonal variations and is being disseminated through inadequate and aging transmission and distribution networks. It comes at very high costs, with Sierra Leone having one of the highest electricity rates in the sub-region. There are many hydropower cascades and plenty of sunlight for solar power generation with an estimated water project potential of more than 1000 MW, while solar possibilities exceed 240 MW. The main Bumbuna Dam hydraulic force, with a peak of 50MW during the rains, is reduced to 8MW in the dry season. Joule Africa is developing sustainable energy projects throughout Africa and is also developing the 485 MW hydro-kpep project in Cameroon. ESCO was founded in 2014 with the support of Joule Africa. Andrew Cavaghan, founder and executive chairman of Joule Africa and director of Seli Hydropower, added: “I am pleased that we have taken this important step in the development of this most important national and regional energy project. Joule Africa has been present in Sierra Leone since 2010 and has established very strong relations in the country during this period. We have also set up an internal team capable of providing and managing this hydro-project project safely and reliably. In a clear sign that the Sierra Leonean government is taking steps to get the country back on its feet after the Ebola crisis, it today signed a 25-year power purchase agreement (AAE) with Joule Africa to give it the power it sorely needs throughout the year.

Joule Africa has signed a 25-year contract with the Sierra Leonean government for the 143 MW Bumbuna II hydroelectric project. Joule Africa and the Sierra Leonean government have signed a 25-year contract for electricity from a 143 MW extension of the 50 MW Bumbuna station. While the government`s overall objective was to provide sufficient energy to all regions of the country, private sector investment and participation in the energy sector was insufficient. As a result, the government has undertaken a number of reforms focused on improving governance and regulation to encourage private sector participation in the sector. The National Electricity Act allows IPPs to participate in the production and distribution of electricity, and the president`s office`s public-private partnership unit has developed a standard power purchase contract to facilitate and expedite negotiations with energy investors and plans to set feed-in tariffs to harmonize the sale of electricity from different IPPs to WAPP and the national grid.

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