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Slavery under international law is the subject of a series of treaties, conventions and declarations. First, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), which states in Article 4 that “no one should be kept in slavery or servitude, slavery in all its forms should be eliminated.” [1] Debt is now the most common form of slavery. This is a condition in which a person “mortgages against a money loan, but the length and type of service are not defined, and the work does not reduce the initial debt.” [16] Slavery for money was included and defined as a form of slavery under the 1956 Complementary Slavery Convention. However, deposit debt and worker debt remain among the many modern forms. [17] In India, denier bondage has been illegal since 1976; However, due to widespread poverty in the country, it continues to exist, as a man may need a credit to finance a wedding, funeral, medicine, fertilizer or fine. [17] Because interest on these debts is so high, the debt is often hereditary and children can replace their fathers or siblings. Debt management can also be due to certain industries – quarrying, carpet manufacturing, agriculture and fishing – where the cost of equipment and supplies is borne by the worker who needs a loan to pay for them. [17] The desire to complete and extend the work done under the Brussels law and to find a way to give practical effect to the intentions expressed by the signatories of the Saint-Germain-en-Laye Convention with regard to the slave trade and slavery, and recognizing the need for more detailed agreements to this end. , the Slavery Convention and its supplementary document are useful in establishing an international definition of slavery; However, there is no significant application behind these documents. Statements made by the international community and agreements that the signatories would amend their national legislation in accordance with the Convention, with the support of the United Nations, if necessary; However, there are no consequences described in the two documents that encourage signatories to abide by the convention “It is recognized that this is a problem, but there is not enough cooperation and so many different concepts now, which is modern slavery,” said Marja Paavilainen, Chief Technical Advisor at the ILO in Bangkok.

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